Home About Us Contact Us News
Share |

The Medical Professionalism Blog

Monthly Archives: March, 2011

Thank You, Dr. Greenfield

Dear Dr. Shelly Greenfield and the Institute of Medicine’s Committee Members on Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines, Thank you for bestowing this gift to the health care industry: For the first time, we have universal standards for developing clinical practice guidelines and systematic reviews.

My EKG

I rarely get sick and have no known disease. I’m fit as a fiddle for an aging male. I jog four times a week and have strong vital signs (blood pressure is 120/70). I have no family history of heart disease.

What’s Culture Got To Do With It?

In my estimation, professionalism has a lot to do with personal values. Thus, when individuals or clinicians are aggregated into groups, their personal values form the base of their organization’s values and culture. It’s not surprising to this sociological-thinking individual when studies show that the differentiating factors between low- and high–performing institutional and ambulatory clinical [...]

Get Smart

In his recent New York Times Op-Ed, “Dumbing Deficits Down,” Paul Krugman ponders why some are vilifying strategies in health care that could “rein in health spending over the long term.” The three strategies he cites are: Investments in preventive health care Finding innovative ways to manage health care costs Finding out what works and [...]

Open or Closed? That is the Question

A study in the American Journal of Surgery found that 30% of breast biopsies done in Florida from 2003-2008 used surgical open biopsies. This number greatly exceeds the current medical guidelines that recommend open biopsies for 10% or less of cases.  The study extrapolates that 300,000 women a year in the U.S. are having unnecessary [...]

Welcome to The Medical Professionalism Blog

Introducing… the first post of “The Medical Professionalism Blog.” There is an increasing focus on the sustainability of the U.S. health care system based on current cost trends. Predictions are for the health care system to consume 19% of the GDP by 2019. How did we get here?