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The Medical Professionalism Blog

Tag Archives: med students

Recommended Reading: September 21-27

Catch up on the latest research on professionalism training and feedback in medical education and training in this week’s Recommended Reading: In “They liked it if you said you cried”: how medical students perceive the teaching of professionalism,” focus groups of Australian medical students revealed that they found their professionalism curriculum overly didactic and narrow, [...]

Recommended Reading: January 25 – February 1

Check out the latest articles on professionalism in medical schools and unnecessary care  in this week’s Recommended Reading: In “Creating a Longitudinal Environment of Awareness: Teaching Professionalism Outside the Anatomy Laboratory,” a fourth-year medical student reflects on the opportunities to teach professionalism in basic science courses in medical school. He argues that while educators have [...]

Extremist Proposal Shocks the Medical Establishment

I suspect many were shocked, even disturbed, upon reading the article, Professionalism, the Invisible Hand, and a Necessary Reconfiguration of Medical Education by distinguished professor of medical education at Mayo Clinic, Fred Hafferty, and his two colleagues, Drs. Brennan and Pawlina. In the article, the authors call for all medical students to achieve competency in [...]

“Nothing About Me Without Me” – What Patients and Students Have To Say

At the end of July, 150 national health leaders will assemble for the annual ABIM Foundation Forum to discuss the economic sustainability of the health care system, and the respective and joint responsibilities of physicians, patients and the health care community. I reflect with a deep sense of awe and gratitude on the important participants [...]

Vampires and Urban Legends: Teaching Residents about Health Care Costs

This past weekend, I gave a talk at the Committee of Interns and Residents, the largest housestaff union in the United States.  The most inspiring moment of the meeting that I witnessed were the two standing ovations earned by Dr. Koffler for advocating for residents to get paid in 1936 (her first paycheck was 15 [...]