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The Medical Professionalism Blog

Tag Archives: stewardship

Help Light the Path from Volume to Value: The Second Annual Teaching Value and Choosing Wisely Challenge

Clinicians are increasingly accountable for delivering better care at lower cost. Despite the rapid evolution of the health care system, many of us still feel left in the dark. Fortunately, there are beacons of light scattered across the United States.

Choosing Wisely: One in a Million

The wastefulness of unnecessary EKGs is a subject that has been featured on this blog many times before, both by me and Dr. Stephen Smith, and a topic that has recently been highlighted in multiple Choosing Wisely ® lists. When I was recently told I needed surgery for cataracts, I was sure I wouldn’t need [...]

Recommended Reading: September 7-13

This week yielded articles touching on a wide range of professionalism issues, including social media, reflection during medical education and stewardship of resources. A new systematic review examines the impact of social media on medical professionalism. The authors conclude that social media offers both challenges to, and opportunities to enhance, medical professionalism. A recent study [...]

Recommended Reading: Aug. 31 – Sept. 6

Catch up on the latest articles on stewardship of resources, physician burnout and conflicts of interest in medical education in this week’s Recommended Reading: In “Exploring Public Attitudes Towards Approaches to Discussing Costs in the Clinical Encounter,” patient focus groups reveal that “trusting relationships may be more conducive than any particular discussion strategy to facilitating doctor-patient discussions [...]

Recommended Reading: August 17 – 23

Get the latest information on patient-centered care, stewardship of resources and conflicts of interest in this Recommended Reading installment: The report  Partnering with Patients to Drive Shared Decisions, Better Value, and Care Improvement  - Workshop Proceedings summarizes a February 2013 Institute of Medicine workshop that considered the central roles patients can play to bring about [...]

The Tremendous Value of the Teaching Value Project

2011 ABIM Foundation Putting the Charter into Practice grantee, Costs of Care, recently released the Teaching Value Project, a series of educational video modules that spotlights ten reasons why clinicians commonly overuse medical tests and treatments. The videos are directed at residents and medical students, though I imagine some faculty could benefit from seeing them. [...]

The Physician’s Role in Controlling Costs

It is with mixed emotion that I greet the results of an important survey in this week’s JAMA of over 2,400 physicians’ views on controlling health care costs. According to the results of the survey, when asked who has a “major responsibility” for controlling health care costs, 60% of surveyed physicians believe that trial lawyers [...]

Recommended Reading: May 18 – 25

This week’s Recommended Reading includes pieces on joy in primary care, stewardship of resources and online professionalism: The Annals of Family Medicine piece, “In Search of Joy in Practice: A Report of 23 High-Functioning Primary Care Practices,” discusses innovations in primary care to facilitate joy in practice and mitigate physician burnout. This research was conducted [...]

There’s More To It Than Just Money

I highly recommend reading a recent report sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Urban Institute (the employer of the authors) by Robert Berenson and Elizabeth Docteur entitled Doing Better by Doing Less; Approaches to Tackle Overuse of Services. It is an excellent analysis of approaches that address the issue of inappropriate and [...]

Recommended Reading: May 4-11

For this week’s Recommended Reading, check out several articles on stewardship of resources, including its role in organizational professionalism: In “From an Ethics of Rationing to an Ethics of Waste Avoidance,” Howard Brody argues for a stepwise strategy to eliminate unnecessary care given the limitations of comparative-effectiveness research, saying, “it is better first to eliminate [...]