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The Medical Professionalism Blog

Tag Archives: sustainability

Reflections on the 2013 ABIM Foundation Forum

This year’s ABIM Foundation Forum – Purpose vs. Payment: Motivating Change in Health Care addressed what will motivate physicians and clinicians to transform medicine to achieve better quality outcomes, patient and physician satisfaction, and economic sustainability. Against the backdrop of the debates raging in Washington, DC over how to fix the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) [...]

Choosing Wisely® and the Rubik’s Cube®

After speaking at an academic medical center and physician-run health plan about Choosing Wisely, a physician told me that he had concluded that the complexity of implementing the Choosing Wisely recommendations was like solving a Rubik’s Cube.  I took that to mean there were multiple changes that all had to align before the recommendations could [...]

Grants Take Choosing Wisely® from Grasstops to Grassroots

The Choosing Wisely® campaign has attracted a lot of attention from the so-called “grasstops” in the form of physician leaders, policy makers, researchers, delivery system leaders, journal authors and the media. This top-down strategy was necessary given a political environment that invoked terms such as “rationing” and “death panels.” Yet, the “grasstops” strategy of the [...]

Recommended Reading: May 12-18

What are current health care cost trends and what can we do to bend the cost curve? Find out in this week’s Recommended Reading: The 2012 Milliman Medical Index, an annual report on health care costs, reveals that annual health care costs for a family of four covered by a preferred provider organization are $20,728. [...]

The Words Used to Talk About Use of Resources: What Do They Tell Us?

The words we use to talk about the use of health care resources makes a difference in how we engage physicians, clinicians and patients in thoughtful discussion around the economic sustainability of the current health care system.  These conversations must happen — without hysteria and political motivation. We need attitudinal and political changes before we [...]

Recommended Reading: March 16-23

How can we address our nation’s spiraling health care costs? This week’s Recommended Reading offers several potential solutions: As Ezra Klein reports, Victor Fuchs and Ezekiel Emanuel have proposed cutting the length of medical training by 30 percent, thereby reducing physician debt and allowing space for more physicians to be trained. The Wall Street Journal [...]

Doctors, Not Financial Engineers

Costs of Care (Twitter: @CostsOfCare), where this post was originally published, is a Boston-based, non-profit organization that helps caregivers deflate medical bills and provide high value care. As part of the 2011 Costs of Care Essay Contest, more than 100 anecdotes were shared by patients and providers around the country that illustrate the role of cost-awareness [...]

Recommended Reading: March 3-8

This week’s Recommended Reading articles highlight several factors that are driving our nation’s ever-increasing health care costs: According to Ezra Klein, high prices are the main reason that U.S. health care is so much costlier than in other countries. He cites a recent International Federation of Health Plans study which shows that Americans pay more [...]

Where, Oh Where Do Physicians Learn About Cost-Effectiveness?

The Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI) defines the Triple Aim as: Better health (population health) Better care (quality improvement) Reduced cost Although many quality improvement organizations and delivery systems are focused on the Triple Aim, cost is not often a part of their efforts.

Recommended Reading: February 22 – March 2, 2012

Recent articles have focused on overuse of medical tests and procedures, particularly among older adults: Is ignorance bliss? In a New York Times op-ed, H. Gilbert Welch writes, “The truth is, the fastest way to get heart disease, autism, glaucoma, diabetes, vascular problems, osteoporosis or cancer … is to be screened for it. In other [...]